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Research Partners
The Next Generation of Solar

NanoFlex Power Corporation has research partners at the University of Southern California and the University of Michigan that are world-renowned for their work with organic electronics. These sponsored research agreements provide NanoFlex Power Corporation with the exclusive worldwide license and right to sublicense any and all intellectual property resulting from the related research and development efforts at these universities.

Dr. Stephen R. Forrest

Principal Research Scientist (University of Michigan)

Dr. Stephen R. ForrestProfessor Stephen R. Forrest has been working with NanoFlex Power Corporation (and its GPEC subsidiary) since 1998 under the Company's Sponsored Research Program with Princeton University, USC, and Michigan. Professor Forrest is one of the Company's Founding Research Scientists; his focus is on organic and GaAs photovoltaics.

In 2006, he rejoined the University of Michigan as Vice President for Research, and as the William Gould Dow Collegiate Professor in Electrical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Physics. A Fellow of the APS, IEEE and OSA and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, he received the IEEE/LEOS Distinguished Lecturer Award in 1996-97, and in 1998 he was co-recipient of the IPO National Distinguished Inventor Award as well as the Thomas Alva Edison Award for innovations in organic LEDs. In 1999, Professor Forrest received the MRS Medal for work on organic thin films.

In 2001, he was awarded the IEEE/LEOS William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award for advances made on photodetectors for optical communications systems. In 2006 he received the Jan Rajchman Prize from the Society for Information Display for invention of phosphorescent OLEDs, and is the recipient of the 2007 IEEE Daniel Nobel Award for innovations in OLEDs. Professor Forrest has been honored by Princeton University establishing the Stephen R. Forrest Faculty Chair in Electrical Engineering in 2012.

Professor Forrest has authored 530 papers in refereed journals, and has 257 US patents. He is co-founder or founding participant in several companies, including Universal Display Corporation (Nasdaq: OLED), Sensors Unlimited (purchased by Goodrich), and Apogee Photonics (purchased by CyOptics), and is on the Board of Directors of Applied Materials and PD-LD, Inc. He has also served from 2009-2012 as Chairman of the Board of Ann Arbor SPARK, the regional economic development organization, and serves on the Board of Governors of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, as well as the Vanderbilt University School of Engineering Board of Visitors.

From 1979 to 1985, Professor Forrest worked at Bell Labs investigating photodetectors for optical communications. In 1992, Professor Forrest became the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. He served as director of the National Center for Integrated Photonic Technology, and as Director of Princeton's Center for Photonics and Optoelectronic Materials (POEM). From 1997-2001, he served as the Chair of the Princeton's Electrical Engineering Department. He was appointed the CSM Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering at the National University of Singapore from 2004-2009. In 2011, Professor Forrest was named number 13 of the top 100 most influential material scientists in the world by Thomson-Reuters, based largely on his work with organic electronics. Professor Forrest is a graduate of the University of Michigan (MSc Physics, 1974 and PhD Physics, 1979) and the University of California at Berkeley (B.A. Physics, 1972).

Click here to Visit: University of Michigan Optoelectronic Components and Materials Group

Dr. Mark E. Thompson

Principal Research Scientist (University of Southern California)

Dr. Mark E. ThompsonProfessor Mark E. Thompson has been working with NanoFlex Power Corporation (and its GPEC subsidiary) since 1994 under the Company's Sponsored Research Program with Princeton University, USC and Michigan. Professor Thompson is a professor of Chemistry at USC. Professor Thompson, in conjunction with Professor Stephen R. Forrest, was instrumental in the discovery of phosphorescent materials central to the highly efficient OLED technology marketed by Universal Display Corporation (NASDAQ: OLED).

In 2013, Professor Thompson was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2012, Professor Thompson received the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. In 2011, Professor Thompson was named number 12 of the top 100 most influential chemists in the world by Thomson-Reuters, based largely on his work with organic electronics. In 2007, Professor Thompson was awarded USC's Associate's Award for Excellence in Research (given to one faculty member per year). In 2006, he was awarded the MRS Medal by the Materials Research Society, and in the same year, Professors Forrest and Thompson were the co-recipients of the Jan Rajchman Prize from the Society for Information Display. Both the MRS medal and the Rajchman Prize were based on the invention of phosphorescent OLEDs. In 1998, Professor Thompson was co-recipient of The Intellectual Property Owners Association National Distinguished Inventor Award as well as the Thomas Alva Edison Award for innovations in organic LEDs.

Professor Thompson joined The University of Southern California in 1995, and from 2005 through 2008, he served as the Department of Chemistry Chairman at USC. From 1987 to 1995, Professor Thompson worked at Princeton University. From 1985 to 1987, Professor Thompson worked at Oxford University and was an S.E.R.C. Research Fellow. From 1983 to 1985, Professor Thompson worked at E.I. duPont de Nemours & Company as a Visiting Scientist. Professor Thompson has authored over 200 papers in refereed journals, and has 75 patents. Professor Thompson is a graduate of the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D. Inorganic Chemistry, 1985) and the University of California Berkley (B.S. Chemistry with honors, 1980).

Click here to Visit: Thompson Research Group at The University of Southern California

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